Photograph from the Carnegie Museum of Art, Film and Video Department archive captured by Robert Haller.                   (source: www.cmoa.org)

A Tiny Leaps Production

 

Experimental Curator: The Sally Dixon Story is a documentary in development that delves into the life of experimental film curator Sally Dixon. Her story began in the 1960's when she received a small hand-held movie camera from her father-in-law and started making films, which she later called "Film Poems." Sally is known as a trailblazer in the "film as art" movement and created the film program at The Carnegie Museum of Art in 1970. She founded the program with the purpose of "promoting a greater understanding and appreciation of film as an art form and the filmmaker as an artist."  It was one of the first museum-based film programs in the country. 

The one hour biographic documentary reflects Sally’s life as a woman in a man’s art world.  The film beautifully weaves in archival footage of Sally as her love of film first emerged as she captured her first images on Super 8 as well as archival footage of her collaborations with artists in Pittsburgh, and finally St. Paul. The documentary threads in contemporary footage of Sally, her family and her friends as they reflect on her enormous impact.  

Dixon worked with artists such as Stan Brakhage, Hollis Frampton, Gunvor Nelson, Robert Breer, Willard Maas and Marie Menken, James Broughton, Joel Singer, Ken Jacobs, Peter Kubelka, Paul Sharits, George Kuchar, Mike Kuchar, Roger Jacoby, Bruce Baillie, Storm de Hirsch, Joyce Weiland and Jonas Mekas.

We encourage you to follow the journey of this exciting new documentary as  Sally Dixon's life story is brought to life once more. 


Interested in supporting this project?

You can now make a DONATION through our Fiscal Sponsor: The Northwest Film Forum

 
 

 Storm De Hirsch and Sally Dixon filming

Photograph from the Carnegie Museum of Art, Film and Video Department archive captured by Michael Chikiris 1971 (source: www.cmoa.org)

About

The production team invested in bringing Sally's story to life. 

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Stan BrakhageRichard Leacock, and Sally Dixon in conversation

Photograph from the Carnegie Museum of Art, Film and Video Department archive captured by Robert Haller 1975. (source: www.cmoa.org)

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